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Ascend
Ascend
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[1]Noun: One who has ascended to a higher toposophic level.

[2]Verb: The act of ascension,



 
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  • Ascend-Transcend
  • Ascension
  • Ascension Maze
  • Ascension Problem - Text by M. Alan Kazlev
    When the average proportion per sapient of a population is ascending or transcending at a rate faster than the economy or infrastructure can support.
  • Ascension, Resistance to
  • Ascension/Transcension Chasers
  • Transcend
  • Transcend-Ascend - Text by M. Alan Kazlev
    One who transcends to one toposophic, then ascends to the next. For example an intelligence may transcend to SI:1, leaving behind everything of itself that was of SI:<1. Then e may ascend to S2, retaining eir SI:1 nature but adding an S2 superstructure on top of the SI:1 nature. Contrast ascend-transcend. Often however the dividing lines are not this well defined.
  • Transcendent Being - Text by M. Alan Kazlev
    An entity that is distinct from physical existence, whether considered ontologically, as a supernatural or supraphysical being, or soteriologically, as a being that is no longer a part of embodied existence or samsara. The existence of a transcendent being or beings (e.g. God, Buddhas, etc.) is central to many religious memeticities, but denied by physicalist memeticities.
  • Transcension
  • Transcension Alert
  • Transcension Machine
  • Transcension Prediction - Text by Anders Sandberg and M. Alan Kazlev
    Given the huge population of the civilized galaxy, and the fact that ascensions and transcensions are moderately common and have been going on for thousands of years, many polities and civilizations have developed some fairly reliable methods for predicting the onset of one of these events. Often this is comparable to pre- and post-singularity efforts at predicting the weather (and a large transcendence event does indeed share some conceptual characteristics with a force of nature to those watching from outside at a lower S level).
  • Transcension Virus
  • Transhuman
 
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Development Notes
Text by M. Alan Kazlev and Steve Bowers
Initially published on 07 October 2001.

 
 
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